What is ARIRON?

‘ARIRON’ is a ferrous alloy cast iron containing more than 14% silicon and is used extensively in the chemical industry as an acid resistant cast iron with wide ranging applications. It is an outstanding acid resistant material with long–term corrosion resistance. ‘ARIRON’ is making significant contributions to current progress and developments within today’s chemical industry. The name ‘ARIRON’ is derived from ‘Acid-Resistant Iron’. It is a registered trademark and is synonymous with the high quality acid-resistant high-silicon cast iron produced in Japan.

Features of ‘ARIRON’, acid-resistant high-silicon cast iron

‘ARIRON’ has high resistance to many organic and inorganic acids, and hydrochloric solutions. ‘ARIRON’ has stable acid resistance under hot conditions and heating, and has high acid resistance to every temperature/concentration of sulfuric acid ‘ARIRON’ is extremely hard and has high abrasion resistance It also has good corrosion resistance to chemical solutions including slurry components. ‘ARIRON’ never partially corrodes like the pitting or intergranular corrosion sometimes seen on stainless steel, so it is suitable as a highly stable acid resistant material. Except hydrofluoric acid, hot concentrated hydrochloric acid, and certain kinds of hot alkali substances. Except fuming sulfuric acid.

Features of ‘OLEMON’, acid-resistant pearlitic cast iron

‘OLEMON’ has high acid resistance to concentrated sulfuric acid (concentration from 95% to 100%) and fuming sulfuric acid. Also due to the effects of Nickel in the alloy, ‘OLEMON’ has extremely high corrosion resistance to aqueous alkali solutions and molten alkali salts. ‘OLEMON’ is highly suitable for aluminum and zinc fusion furnaces. It has high abrasion resistance and similar workability to gray iron.

‘SUPIRON’ and ‘OJIRON’

Currently SANKO PUMP alone produces, and distributes ‘SUPIRON’ and ‘OJIRON’***. ‘SUPIRON’, and ‘OJIRON’, represent an important part of our product lines alongside ‘ARIRON’ and ‘OLEMON’. ***NISSAN KIKO withdrew from operations; Kyodo Machinery initially succeeded them, but has since closed.